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Apple is being taken apart by Capitalism

I’m right, right of center that is. I love capitalism’s quirks. But I despise consumerism. That being said, Apple sucks!

I’ve used Apple products since 1980 and they stood for something. But I believe what made Apple great was precisely what Tim Cook has come to destroy…it’s passion for being different, just like its 1984 ad!

I started programming for Apple in 2009. I had programmed for Windows and I even got into Android and it just blew! Crappy IDE’s, multiple, unstable, buggy SDK’s galore, sluggish, unresponsive hardware to go with it.

Well I’m sad to say that’s what Apple is now in 2014. I’ve lived through 6 major versions of the IDE Xcode and 5 versions of their iOS. Not to mention the minor versions in between. All this time of course, I have needed a Mac to program for iOS. Throughout this time I’ve seen all three: iOS, Xcode and the hardware, literally go down the drain.

Who is to blame? Capitalism of course. Capitalism is great, a great broth for innovation and re-invention. But let’s simplify what happens with any new ideas in our capitalistic ‘free’ market nowadays.

1. Someone has a great idea. Jobs had one. Although it was technically Woz’s idea. Jobs idea was to market it to everyone.

2. To have that idea take off, you have to put some money into it. Takes money to make money, right?

3. Now the idea takes off. People say: “Hey, that’s a great product! Do you sell other stuff? Do you sell those in Europe? Will you have a new product next year? Man, your products are so good I’d buy anything from you!”

Sound like anything that crossed your mind after buying something from a good company? Be it computers or great coffee.

But let’s take those each in turn cause this is where things go awry. (1). You don’t sell other stuff. But now those very few consumers who made you $100,000 profit this year, want to buy something else from you. Let’s make a new product, we need money for that. So take those 100k and put them into a new product division. (2). You don’t sell anywhere else but from your garage. So we need to expand, so we need money for that. Oh and since we need to ship things now, we not only need more overhead but also more things to make our product last more, be it packaging for products or chemicals for food (oh yeah, your product is looking really nice now). (3). You hadn’t thought about a new product but now your customers asked for it. The lure of money is too strong.

Add to all this that you may take your company public to make money and grow. This makes other people have a say in your company. You might think taking a company public just brings in money, but it does something worse. It brings in pressure from shareholders to squeeze more out of every revenue dollar or even worse, spending cuts or re-engineering investments which basically take a wholesome product like Corn Flakes and adds carcinogenic preservatives; or a great burger into a pitifully sized cardboard filled meat pie; or a truly different iOS/OSX software into a bug-laden, unstable-multi-versioned beachballin nightmare!

Capitalism might be great in a free market. The problem is Adam never really defined ‘free’. The forces acting in the market today are as dark and sinister as any Sith or politician.

Tim Cook took over a great company and is riding it’s innovation wave. Unfortunately he is the perfect sequel to an original innovator like Jobs. The innovator set the wheels in motion and creates a truly unique product and possibly a few aggregate products around it. But then a calculating suit takes over and starts growing too fast, investing in non-value adding projects and divesting resources from wow-factor generating winners.

Yes, Apple is making but loads of money. But It’s not very innovative. And it will run out of steam eventually.
Sure, Cook may have gauged just how much momentum Apple has and could be waiting until he really needs umph. He might even get his calculations right. But it’s just not Apple anymore…it’s more like IBM! Looks like Apple’s 1984 was actually 30 years later 😦IMG_4561.JPG